Fabio Mauri

Fabio Mauri

Originally from Rome, Fabio Mauri (1926-2009) was one of the great Italian avant-garde masters of the 1960s. Despite having grown up in an Italy impacted by the Second World War and Fascism, Mauri has always inhabited an intellectual environment, mixing with writers such as Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco, and artists like Pier Paolo Pasolini and Jannis Kounellis. His works emerge from a strong sense of social responsibility, showing continuous political commitment against Fascism, and invite the viewer to cast a critical eye on their experience of reality. As cinema and television become part of daily life in the 1950s, Fabio Mauri came to regard the screen as the world’s principal ‘symbolic form’, a sign of the new media civilization. In 1957, he began his series ‘Screens’: a series of empty screens corresponding with interior spaces are represented on the canvas, which invite possible projections from the viewers. Mauri continued to make works on the theme of memory and pretense until the 1970s, when he progressed from painting to performance. The artist crossed the limits of the canvas, transferring his interest from painting to action, but continued to consider art as a meeting point between individual destiny and history.

Recent exhibitions dedicated to Fabio Mauri have been held at MADRE in Napoli (2016), Hauser & Wirth in London (2014 and 2015), the Fundación PROA in Buenos Aires (2013) and Palazzo Reale in Milan (2012). Some of Fabio Mauri’s have been shown at Palazzo Grassi in the exhibition “Italics” (2008) and at Punta della Dogana in the exhibition “Accrochage” (2016).